Kelsey Hassevoort

Post Doctoral Fellow

Email: hassevo2@illinois.edu

Kelsey earned a Ph.D. in Neuroscience from the University of Illinois in 2018. Her research interests lie at the intersection of memory and health and she has cultivated an interdisciplinary program of research that investigates the contributions of physical health factors – including aerobic fitness, body composition, nutrition – to hippocampal-dependent cognition during childhood. To accomplish this, she has developed and utilized sensitive behavioral tasks in combination with physiological and structural neuroimaging techniques. As a postdoctoral fellow, she will extend these lines of research to include young and older adult populations.

Matthew Moore

Post Doctoral Fellow

Email: mmoore16@illinois.edu

Matt Moore received his Ph.D. in Psychology from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 2018, and is currently a Beckman Institute Postdoctoral Fellow. His main research interests include the examination of cognitive and affective processes through the investigation of brain structure, brain function, and behavior, using complementary methodologies. More specifically, he is interested in examining aspects of cognitive control, emotion processing, decision making, social cognition, and individual differences related to these processes. He uses techniques such as structural and functional MRI, EEG/ERPs, and optical imaging (EROS, NIRS), as well as combinations of these techniques (e.g., simultaneous fMRI-EEG-EROS), in conjunction with behavioral and neuropsychological assessment tools.

Tanveer Talukdar

Post Doctoral Fellow

ttanveer@illinois.edu
Lab Phone: 217-300-1464

My research interest is computational modeling of human brain activity from neural signals measured using non-invasive neuroimaging techniques. In my PhD dissertation I investigated the relationship between neural activity and the hemodynamics response using system identification methods. This relationship called neurovascular coupling is a complex biophysical process that is critical for normal functioning of the brain. I am also interested in developing signal processing tools for analyzing and interpreting neuroimaging signals, which could help in the clinical diagnosis of neurological disorders.

Chris Zwilling

Chris Zwilling

Chris ZwillingPost Doctoral Fellow

Email: zwillin1@illinois.edu
Phone: 217-300-2530

Chris Zwilling is interested in model based cognitive neuroscience which uses cognitive or behavioral models to gain insight into the underlying neural substrate. He is currently interested in models of higher order cognition, including decision making processes and working memory.  To accomplish these goals, he employs various statistical methodologies, including Bayesian analyses and structural equation modeling.